A Real Time Line

Now that I have a definite deadline I can make a plan. Since there are so many of these available online and in print, it doesn’t make much sense for me to try to cook my own up. No need to reinvent the wheel.

However, the assumption (oh yes I used that word) of most or all of these is that the test-taker is new to LSAT material. This means that these schedules are created with the first several weeks introducing the user to the World of the LSAT: How to do the games, how to read the logical reasoning, the different types of questions and how to attack them, the mindset and assumptions of the logical reasoning question authors, and other things you need to know if you’re going to stand a fighting chance on this thing.

I’m not one of those. I’ve read the books and the blogs and the essays and watched the videos. I’ve heard pretty much all of it, so I don’t need to spend weeks studying up on it, taking the time again as though this is my first time seeing it. So far my best score is 171, untimed, so I am getting a lot of it. I just need reminders. These things, my months of studying already and the fact that it is at least to some degree working, mean that the pre-made schedules aren’t going to be quite right for my needs. They will work as a great starting place and way to figure out how to organize my time and practice.

Most of them seem to want you to study hard on a single thing for a few days or a week, with small pieces of the other sections spattered in there so you don’t forget those things while you’re intensely looking at the other. For example, many will have you doing only one type of logic game for several days, but to make sure you don’t lose what you’ve learned about the other things, to do a few of each type of logical reasoning and a couple reading comprehension passages. That seems like it should work for me, so I’m going to give it a try.

There are obstacles to this for me, things that make my schedule erratic and difficult to even really call a “schedule,” such as my kids, work, home, family, and husband, most of which I did not have five or more years ago (the age of most test-takers and the age group for whom many of the schedules are developed). So it’s going to take some doing.

I think it’s going to be worth it. At least it better be. It’s going to cost me around $100 in books by the time I’m done, and the test itself is $175, a lot of money for me.

On another note, I finished Grey’s a long time ago, then finished Scandal, and have moved on to Supernatural. This is yet another show people have been telling me to watch for years and I don’t know why I held out. It’s good. Even if it is scary and  I generally don’t care for scary, I can handle this one.

Officially Registered

I registered for the February 2016 LSAT today. I was going to do the December 2015 one, but I got the late registration deadline wrong in my head and missed it by exactly a week. That one week equals a $90 fee, for a total of a $265 test. Way, way too much for us. So I’ll push it another three months and do it in February.

It’s time. I’m not sure I’m ready to take the test, but I am sure I need to be done studying and anticipating.

Necessary Assumption

  • Necessary Assumption Questions, Negation Test, and Must be True Qs from “LSAT Blog: Ace the LSAT”
    • Discusses a “common and effective strategy” for attacking these questions
    • The “Negation”/”Denial” Test
    • “As the name implies, this “test” requires you to negate each of the answer choices. The correct answer choice, when negated, renders the argument invalid. The argument cannot be valid if the necessary assumption is not true. After all, the necessary assumption is, in fact, necessary for the argument to work” [emphasis mine]
    • “Ask yourself as you read each answer choice, does this *need* to be true for the evidence to require the conclusion?” [emphasis mine]
    • Negate the answer to the logical opposite, not polar opposite (“All people are standing” –> “Not all people are standing”)
    • Necessary Assumption questions are in the Must be True category
    • Correct answer does not bring in any new information
  • What is a Necessary Assumption? from Manhattan Prep Forums
    • “A necessary assumption is something that is REQUIRED for the argument to be true, meaning if this assumption is false, then the argument CANNOT be valid. The conclusion WILL not follow given the evidence.”
    • “Necessary assumptions, when negated, will destroy the argument (meaning, you can’t definitively draw the conclusion given the premises).” [emphasis mine]
    • “You negate the answer choice, and then add it into the argument. If it’s truly a necessary assumption, you should find yourself saying “Well, how can we draw that conclusion then?!”” [emphasis mine]
    • “If it’s not a necessary assumption, the negated form should be irrelevant to whether we can draw the conclusion or not.” [emphasis mine]
  • How to Master LSAT Logical Reasoning Necessary Assumption Questions by Lawschooli.
    • “When you hear the word ‘assumption’, I want you to just think ‘premise’. In an LSAT LR question, a necessary assumption is just another premise that supports the conclusion, only it goes unsaid. Commit this to memory: a necessary assumption is really just an unstated premise.”
    • Look for leaps and assumptions
    • Watch for leaps between cause and effect. Does the stated cause necessarily or only cause the effect?
    • “Spotting assumptions can be tough. The truth is that your brain is probably so good at understanding unstated assumptions that you don’t often even notice them.”
    • “…you are trying to identify the passage author’s assumptions, not make your own. Remember that.” [emphasis mine]
    • “You simply see what would happen to the argument if the assumption you are testing is not true. If the argument gets blown all to bits by negating an answer choice, then bam, you know that assumption was necessary. It’s the right answer.” [emphasis mine]
    • Excellent demonstration of negation!
    • “If you can imagine any reason why the argument can survive without a premise, it’s not that right answer.”
  • How to Approach Necessary Assumption Questions by 7sage
    • “Necessary assumptions can wreck an argument.” [emphasis mine]
    • “Argument (valid) –> Necessary Assumption (true)
      /Necessary Assumption –> /Argument” [emphasis mine]
    • There are two types of Necessary Assumptions: Shield & Bridge
      • “Answers to shield type necessary assumption questions protect your argument from being wrecked.” [emphasis mine]
      • Bridge: “these answer choices point out gaps in the logic of the argument.” [emphasis mine]; “Bridge questions trade on your inclination to conflate two different ideas“; you must make the connection, and that connection must be vital to the conclusion; “It’s your job to find this bridge in the answer choice that takes you from the premise to the conclusion.
  • What Necessary Assumption Means by Foxlsat.com
    • “Your task is to identify an answer that must be true, in order for the argument to even conceivably be true. In other words, it’s asking you to identify an answer that, if untrue, would cause the argument to fail. In other words, it’s asking for a necessary condition.” [bolding mine, italics and link theirs]
  • Necessary Assumption Questions Suck Ass by thedreadedlsat.tumblr.com
    • “I think of Necessary Assumption questions as Weaken questions. I look for ways to weaken the argument and then search the negated answer choices that weakens the argument.” [emphasis mine]
    • Pay attention to the scope of the stimulus and the answer choices, gives a good explanation of negation